There is an ocean in my soul.

htimsnevets:

sir-hathaway:

taiikawaii:

trilliansthoughts:

This miniature ecosystem has been thriving in an almost completely isolated state for more than forty years. It has been watered just once in that time.The original single spiderwort plant has grown and multiplied, putting out seedlings. As it has access to light, it continues to photosynthesize. The water builds up on the inside of the bottle and then rains back down on the plants in a miniature version of the water cycle.
As leaves die, they fall off and rot at the bottom producing the carbon dioxide and nutrients required for more plants to grow.

if you don’t think this is fucking rad then get out of my face

I want a massive self sustaining ecosystem. 

its called earth.

htimsnevets:

sir-hathaway:

taiikawaii:

trilliansthoughts:

This miniature ecosystem has been thriving in an almost completely isolated state for more than forty years. It has been watered just once in that time.

The original single spiderwort plant has grown and multiplied, putting out seedlings. As it has access to light, it continues to photosynthesize. The water builds up on the inside of the bottle and then rains back down on the plants in a miniature version of the water cycle.

As leaves die, they fall off and rot at the bottom producing the carbon dioxide and nutrients required for more plants to grow.

if you don’t think this is fucking rad then get out of my face

I want a massive self sustaining ecosystem. 

its called earth.

http://approachwithtrepidation.tumblr.com/post/97816639286/yesterday-i-mistook-my-long-acting-insulin-for-my

t1ismylife:

approachwithtrepidation:

Yesterday I mistook my long acting insulin for my short acting one, basically I just took a huge dose of my humalog. Well needless to say I’m lucky I’m alive. After the whole ordeal I realized I do not know enough about diabetes to take care of myself. Soo I have a few questions for my fellow type…

1) Drink water and wait it out.  Whimper on the couch about how much this sucks.

2) Approach teacher before or after class on day one.  ”Hey, can we talk for a sec?”  Explain that you’re diabetic, and try to include info about high/low sugars symptoms and effects on you and your schoolwork.

Also, if you alert your school ahead of time, they may hold a meeting among your teachers to let them all know about your needs.  Get familiar with your school nurse if you can so he/she can give support.

3) 15 grams of carbohydrate every 10-15 minutes until BG is back in range, unless I’m under 50 mg/dL.  Then I start with 30 grams, followed by 15 grams every 10-15 minutes until sugar’s up.  Liquids can get into your system more quickly, so juice, milk, or regular soda are better options when low, but any source of carbs can do the job.

I will admit, this can be really hard to follow when in the low-sugar fog.  I try not to beat myself up when I devour 8 cookies and half a bag of chips in the span of 5 minutes, and I don’t think anyone else should either.  Just take the insulin for the extra carbs once the BG’s back up.

4) Oh gawd.  I don’t notice a difference while my sugar’s high, but it’s not unheard of for diabetics to have trouble thinking while high.  Be extra careful on test days, because the high- or low-sugar fog can last beyond the actual hyper/hypoglycemic episode.

I think diabetes effects school in less direct ways.  A low sugar at 2 AM leaves you sleep deprived.  Time taken out of class while you’re at a doctor appointment.  You’re late to school because you woke up late and can’t skip breakfast.  A compromised immune system makes you sick more often.  I’mma stop now before I get depressed.

Diabetes basically makes life more challenging all around.  You just have to do the best you can with the hand you’re dealt.  Try to work with your teachers; don’t expect them to understand what’s happening to you unless you talk to them.  Most (if not all) teachers will make room for your needs if you just tell them what those needs are.  Don’t be afraid to alert them to a low blood sugar.

Staying on top of your sugars and working with your doctor can really lessen how much diabetes gets in the way at school.  Make your health a priority.

Sorry, this got super long winded. xD

Edit:

I’m making this even more long winded because I thought maybe some of my actual experiences might give you some clues into what I’m talking about.

My senior year of high school, I had at least 3 teachers that kept candy in their desks specifically for me in case I needed it.  Even though I only ever needed a teacher’s desk candy once that whole year (I’ve very careful to always have carbs on hand), this still meant the world to me.  Because they knew what I was probably doing, they never called me out in class for having a snack, preventing some embarrassment for me.

My high school did indeed hold meetings with my teachers at the beginning of semesters specifically about me.  They never asked me to attend, so it wasn’t a hassle or anything in my life.  As far as I know, the school nurse led the meetings, and I trusted her to share accurate info (hence why I say to get to know your school nurse).

One time in middle school, I had a high sugar that left me confused and agitated, and I walked into my Spanish class on the wrong day, unable to articulate what was wrong (I don’t think I even knew what was wrong at the time).  My teacher had my friend take me to the office so I could be taken care of.  I’m very thankful that he had some understanding of what my deal was, or he might have sent me to detention or something.

Thank you so much for sharing your experiences! I have a tough time with that high blood sugar mental fog a lot with school as well.

Yesterday I mistook my long acting insulin for my short acting one, basically I just took a huge dose of my humalog. Well needless to say I’m lucky I’m alive. After the whole ordeal I realized I do not know enough about diabetes to take care of myself. Soo I have a few questions for my fellow type 1 diabetics because I really don’t have much experience and I could really learn a lot from you guys ❤️

1. When you have high blood sugar and your body feels all ucky what do you do to deal with it (other than taking insulin of course)

2. How do you bring up the fact that you’re a diabetic to people who should be aware? For example: teachers…

3. How do you treat your lows?

4. How does diabetes affect your ability in school?

And please feel free to add any other sort of advice for me. I would GREATLY appreciate it. ❤️❤️❤️

diabetesyoyo:

up and down sugar levels;

* makes me feel possessed

* stuck in an old person’s body

* falling apart at a young age

* confused, stressed, depressed and tired

* up and down sugar levels make me feel like I am someone else and not really myself :)

(via krspt1d)

neurosciencestuff:

Joslin Scientists Generate First Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Patients with Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young
Joslin scientists report the first generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with an uncommon form of diabetes, maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). These cells offer a powerful resource for studying the role of genetic factors in the development of MODY and testing potential treatments. The findings appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are adult cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to exhibit the characteristics of embryonic stem cells, including the ability to differentiate into specialized cell types. The generation of hiPSCs, which was first reported in 2006, was a major scientific breakthrough with the potential to increase understanding of many diseases and aid in drug development.
Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a form of diabetes that mainly affects individuals age 25 or younger and accounts for about 1 to 5 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States. Unlike type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which are polygenic and result from alterations in genetic and environmental factors, MODY is a monogenic disease that results from mutations in a single gene. To date, eight types of MODY and eleven MODY genes have been identified. Some types of MODY produce only mild symptoms and are often treated solely with oral diabetic medications.
Joslin Diabetes Center is one of a limited number of research institutes with the capability to generate hiPSCs from patients with diabetes. The cells used to produce the hiPSCs were obtained from patients with five different types of MODY at Joslin Diabetes Center and Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. The MODY-hiPSCs are morphologically, molecularly and functionally indistinguishable from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs).
As a monogenic disease, MODY provides “a valuable opportunity to directly study in more detail the genetic mechanisms underlying the disease and not be influenced by other factors, such as insulin resistance,” says senior author Rohit N. Kulkarni, M.D., Ph.D., a Principal Investigator in the Section on Islet Cell and Regenerative Biology at Joslin and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.
The scientists will first induce the MODY-hiPSCs to differentiate towards beta cells and in the process learn more about the potential blocks in their ability to differentiate. Using the iPSC-derived beta cells, they plan to study how MODY genes regulate the insulin secretory function. “Generating hiPSCs is an important step forward because we cannot obtain beta cells from living patients. These cells will allow us to do many experiments that otherwise would not be possible,” says Dr. Kulkarni.
The scientists also plan to explore ways to correct the genetic defect and use the beta cells derived from the “repaired” hiPSCs to test various treatments. “If we find medications that improve beta cell function, we can go back to the clinic and use them to treat patients,” says Dr. Kulkarni. “It will allow us to tailor treatments to a patient’s unique characteristics and provide personalized medicine to diabetes patients.”

neurosciencestuff:

Joslin Scientists Generate First Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Patients with Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young

Joslin scientists report the first generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with an uncommon form of diabetes, maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). These cells offer a powerful resource for studying the role of genetic factors in the development of MODY and testing potential treatments. The findings appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are adult cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to exhibit the characteristics of embryonic stem cells, including the ability to differentiate into specialized cell types. The generation of hiPSCs, which was first reported in 2006, was a major scientific breakthrough with the potential to increase understanding of many diseases and aid in drug development.

Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a form of diabetes that mainly affects individuals age 25 or younger and accounts for about 1 to 5 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States. Unlike type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which are polygenic and result from alterations in genetic and environmental factors, MODY is a monogenic disease that results from mutations in a single gene. To date, eight types of MODY and eleven MODY genes have been identified. Some types of MODY produce only mild symptoms and are often treated solely with oral diabetic medications.

Joslin Diabetes Center is one of a limited number of research institutes with the capability to generate hiPSCs from patients with diabetes. The cells used to produce the hiPSCs were obtained from patients with five different types of MODY at Joslin Diabetes Center and Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. The MODY-hiPSCs are morphologically, molecularly and functionally indistinguishable from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs).

As a monogenic disease, MODY provides “a valuable opportunity to directly study in more detail the genetic mechanisms underlying the disease and not be influenced by other factors, such as insulin resistance,” says senior author Rohit N. Kulkarni, M.D., Ph.D., a Principal Investigator in the Section on Islet Cell and Regenerative Biology at Joslin and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

The scientists will first induce the MODY-hiPSCs to differentiate towards beta cells and in the process learn more about the potential blocks in their ability to differentiate. Using the iPSC-derived beta cells, they plan to study how MODY genes regulate the insulin secretory function. “Generating hiPSCs is an important step forward because we cannot obtain beta cells from living patients. These cells will allow us to do many experiments that otherwise would not be possible,” says Dr. Kulkarni.

The scientists also plan to explore ways to correct the genetic defect and use the beta cells derived from the “repaired” hiPSCs to test various treatments. “If we find medications that improve beta cell function, we can go back to the clinic and use them to treat patients,” says Dr. Kulkarni. “It will allow us to tailor treatments to a patient’s unique characteristics and provide personalized medicine to diabetes patients.”

(via krspt1d)